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Story continued....

After completing their tour of duty they returned to civilian life in their home state, no longer the same young men who left home to serve their country. The men that returned home would be forever-bonded together by their shared experiences in the Army. For 47 years they've had no contact with each other, each occasionally thinking of those days together and wondering what was going on in the lives of their friends. Then through the curiosity and efforts of one, 2 were connected. Then 4 and now... 8 have reconnected and are sharing their life experiences and photos, reliving the memories of those days in Korea.

We are still searching for those missing few. We are now those “Few Old Men” looking for our once young friends from Camp Page. If you are one of those who were there with us at Camp Page Korea, 226 Signal Company, Radio Section 1964-65, you may see your photo here.  Contact us even if you were there a few years before or after us and share your story and photos.

Here are some of us..!
"Welcome" to our home...
(on the 38th parallel in South Korea)
email me
A Story of a Few Young Men

June and July of 1963 several young men from across the US received a notice to report for a pre-induction physical. These men came from Michigan, Wisconsin, Maryland, West Virginia, North Carolina, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and a couple other states that may have slipped my memory. Each passed their physical and were inducted into the Army. All completed their basic training at various basic training facilities near their home state. Then all were sent to Fort Gordon, Georgia for “Advanced Individual Training” as “Radio Teletype Operators”.

Upon completion of that training all came down on orders to go to Camp Page, Korea. That is just the way it was during the “Draft” years.  All these fine young men answered the call to be “American Citizen-Soldiers”. These young men, prior to this time, did not know one another however over the next 13 months everything they did, they’d do together. Eat, sleep, play, train, laugh, sight-see, and yes... even cry (there were some sad times but also many happy times).


Doing everything together, 24/7...
"Land of the Morning Calm"...
...suggests an exotic, peaceful Shangri-La.  Though the country has fertile valleys and quiet temples, it has seldom been peaceful...

....Japan had ruled the Korean peninsula for 35 years until the end of World War II. At that time, Allied leaders decided to temporarily occupy the country until elections could be held and a government established. Soviet forces occupied the north, while U.S. forces occupied the south. The planned elections did not take placed, as the Soviet Union established a communist state in North Korea, and the U.S. set up a pro-western state in South Korea, each state claiming to be sovereign over the entire peninsula...

...this standoff led to the Korean War... from the spring of 1950 until July 1953… well they didn't’ call it a war but lots of young men were killed there… sounds like a war to me… now they call it The Forgotten War<--(check it out)... Do you know it has never ended..? An armistice agreement was signed on 27 July 1953 stopped most of the killing… however, to this day, the two countries are still technically at war... there is still some killing going on... a few every year...

This is about “a Few Young Men“ who went to Korea in 1964-65 to...
"Guard Freedom's Frontier"
Updated on: 4 May, 2014
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After play..."If you see any of these guys tell 
'um I'm lookin' for 'um... and  then 
let me know... thanks.. DK
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To see the larger photos just click on the first photo... there'll be navigation buttons (<prev l next>) at the top and comments at the bottom...
The Demilitarized Zone War
Little or nothing is known of the DMZ WAR.  From the mid-60s to the mid-70s attention was drawn to Vietnam.  280+ American soldiers were killed in action in the DMZ that separates South Korea from communist North Korea.  Yes these patriotic DMZ sons and their veteran fathers of the 50s are heartfelt by their families, loved ones and survivors that
REMEMBER KOREA
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